A Letter to Jimmy Wales – Point one (Extract)

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A Letter To Jimmy Wales: From 1984 to 2017 (Polis)

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“A Place in the World” an Award Winning Novel by Cinda Crabbe MacKinnon: a Critical Review.

indexcby Rina Brundu. The geographical and cultural background of the award winning novel “A Place in the World” (2013) by Cinda Crabbe MacKinnon is a country where “The drug cartels exceeded the violence of the guerrillas and bandits. Cocaine ruled, and drug lord Pablo Escobar was feared throughout the country”; a country which “has been at war with both the Marxist guerrillas and left wing paramilitary for decades, but the violence since the 70’s escalated with the drug trade”; a country in which “In 1989 President Galan was assassinated and two presidential candidates killed”; a country where coffee fincas (farms) can be easily and unexpectedly put out of business by acid rain from powerful volcanic eruptions… But it is also a country of decent and good-natured people, unspeakable beauty, and a paradise for botanists and geologists the world over who in its interior can enjoy all “maravillas” of the real jungle. This country is Colombia. Read More

The Migrant Child – A Poem

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A letter from Israel after the terror attack at Jerusalem Synagogue

Bill_Clinton,_Yitzhak_Rabin,_Yasser_Arafat_at_the_White_House_1993-09-13

Forward: Canadian-born Janice Weizman has lived in Israel for the past 30 years. She is the author of The Wayward Moon, a historical novel set in the 9th century Middle East, which came out in 2012 with Yotzeret Publishing. The novel won both a gold medal in the Independent Publisher awards, and a second gold medal in the Midwest Book Awards. Her writing has appeared in Lilith, Jewish Fiction, The Jerusalem Report, and other publications. She is the founder and managing editor of The Ilanot Review, an online literary journal affiliated with Bar-Ilan university. After my first interview to Janice – the occasion was the awarding of Literature Nobel Prize 2013 to Canadian writer Alice Munro – we kept in touch and we hear from each other from time to time. Here below I am publishing my last email-exchange with her, following the dramatic attack of yesterday on Jerusalems’ Synagogue, a dreadful blast in which 4 rabbis have lost their lives “Aryeh Kopinsky, 43 years old, Avraham Shmuel Goldberg, 68 years old, Calman Levine, 55 years old , and Moshe Twersky, 59 years old.
Rina Brundu, in Dublin, 19th November 2014

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The Nobel Prize in Literature awarded to Stephen King: WHEN?

I do not believe there would be any science at all without intuition.

(Rita Levi Montalcini, 1902-2012, 1986 Nobel Prize in Phisiology or Medicine) Read More

Does Castro’s Cuba still exist? An interview with writer Gordiano Lupi

by Rina Brundu. Gordiano Lupi, Italian writer and publisher, has been for several years the Italian translator of the Spanish language blog Generation Y, a blog owned by a Cuban dissident of Castro politics, Yoani Sanchez. Following their recent artistic break up – I have asked Gordiano a few questions about the actual motives that led their friendship to such an unhappy end as well as about the political status quo of modern Cuba. Read More

In the footsteps of the Nobel Prize in Literature 2013 Alice Munro

by Rina Brundu. Janice Weizman was born in Canada and has lived in Israel for the past 30 years. She is the author of The Wayward Moon, a historical novel set in the 9th century Middle East, which came out in 2012 with Yotzeret Publishing. The novel won both a gold medal in the Independent Publisher awards, and a second gold medal in the Midwest Book Awards. Her writing has appeared in Lilith, Jewish Fiction, The Jerusalem Report, and other publications. She is the founder and managing editor of The Ilanot Review, an online literary journal affiliated with Bar-Ilan university. Read More

My father Giovannino: an exclusive interview with Mr Alberto Guareschi

by Rina Brundu. There are no more than two statements which we can regard as true: 1) we are all doomed to die, 2) Italy has never been the birthplace of great writers. But while the first has been disproved (even if it took three days before resurrection and it has been costing us almost 2000 years of tithes to be paid to the “family”!), the latter lives on unchallenged and as true as ever. This is because in Italy the title of Great Writer MUST be DESERVED. Bluntly said, it is not enough for a literary author – in order to be crowned as such – to have been one who has successfully created a few immortal characters, who has managed to model a language, who has given a substantial hand in helping his/her nations’ cultural growth, who has succeeded in transforming his/her most inspired moments into some sort of shared experience with million of readers; on the contrary, it is a STRICT requirement that he/she also befriends the “right” people, that he/she gets the approval of the intellectual caste, that he/she grows fond of pseudo-artistic snobberies and that he/she grows a taste…  for butt-kissing.   Read More

Samia Yusuf Omar’s Italian dream. An interview with Teresa Krug of Al Jazeera

by Rina Brundu. Today (1) the Italian paper Corriere della Sera reported the death of the young Somalian sprinter Samia Yusuf Omar (2), as told by athlete and countryman Abdi Bile. Samia – who during the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing “managed a personal record of 32.16 seconds in the 200 metre sprint event, with the crowd roaring in applause” – allegedly died while on her way to Italy on a boat from Libya. The news reports are far from clarifying the matter, therefore I have asked a few questions to Teresa Krug, writer and Al Jazeera journalist, who had interviewed Samia during the past months for the publication of a book about her life. Read More